Review: “My Brother’s Husband” (Volume 1) by Gengoroh Tagame

You’re a single Japanese father named Yaichi, who spends most of time at home raising his rambunctious but innocent daughter Kana. One day, a large foreigner from Canada named Mike Flanagan arrived at their doorstep and reveals himself to be Kana’s uncle. Not only that, but the husband of Yaichi’s estranged (and sadly deceased) twin brother Ryouji. Illustrated and written by Genoroh Tagame, this is the plot of “My Brother’s Husband”.

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Anime Review: “Grimoire of Zero”

Grimoire of Zero is licensed by Sentai Filmworks, MVM Films, animated by White Fox, and the original creator and illustrator is respectively Kakeru Kobashiri and Yoshinori Shizuma.

Yes, I’m reviewing an anime. Sue me.

And in case you’re wondering: this is not a comparison between the anime and the light novels, which I will read and review in the future. For now, I’m simply reviewing this as its own thing and not an adaptation.

Okay? Okay. Now where was I? Oh yeah, I should also mention this review contains spoilers, so go at your own risk if you haven’t seen or read Grimoire of Zero.

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Review: “The Great American Whatever” by Tim Federle

Warning: this review contains spoilers. To read them, highlight the black bars, read at your own risk, and enjoy 🙂

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To finish off LGBT Pride Month (belatedly) and celebrate American Independence Day, why not we review an LGBT young adult novel that’s recent (and is technically about American story/cinema), and what Kirkus Reviews called, “A Holden Caulfield for a new generation.” Really?

Enter Tim Federle’s debut novel, “The Great American Whatever”. Continue reading

Review: “The Thousandth Floor” (The Thousandth Floor #1) by Katherine McGee

A part of me really wants to praise the hell out of this book for so many reasons, many of which are legit and other reviewers agree with. It has an incredible setting you can’t get enough of, a beautifully poignant writing niche, lovable romances and charismatic characters (who are ethnically diverse) as well as a brilliant build-up to a shocking ending. However, there are a couple of things that keep it from being a masterpiece, and one character that really irks me the more I think about him.

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Review: “Pax” by Sara Pennypacker

What makes the bond of an owner and a pet so special? What makes that bond so inseparable in someone’s youth and adulthood? These are questions I’ve asked ever since my first dog died over a decade ago, and I’ve learned the answer to as I grew up.

“Pax” is a novel I initially noticed while visiting a local bookstore, and was drawn to how simple yet detailed Jon Klassen’s illustration of the cover showed. Add Sara Pennypacker’s heartwarming and poignantly timeless writing style similar to “Coraline”, and you get s novel that left me yearning for a good ending.

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Top 10 LGBT YA Novels I Recommend

Before you read, I’d like to dedicate this post to all the families and victims hurt in this morning’s tragedy. For those who for some reason haven’t heard, a lone shooter mercilessly massacred fifty people and injured just as many at a gay nightclub (called Pulse) in Orlando, Florida. Police are still investigating into further detail, but it is a known fact that this wasn’t just a random shooting. This was a hate-fueled attack meant to kill and harm innocent people.

If anyone is reading this, don’t pray for repentance or hate, but pray for the families and friends that have been affected by what many are calling the worst mass shooting in United States history. Do not call for gun control. Reports are coming in that the gunman was posing as a security guard and guns were not allowed in the club. If there is anything we should call for, it’s for the acceptance of LGBTQA+ people everywhere, and to fight homophobic attacks like this with love and understanding.

To everyone affected by the shooting, everyone is hearing your cries. And to everyone else, I have a quote for you from a Holocaust survivor named Henry Golde, “Hate is nothing, and love is everything.”

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          Gay literature is an iconic part of the LGBTQA+ community, especially towards teenagers and young adults, so in celebration of LGBT Pride Month, I’ve decided to make a Top 10 list for the best gay young adult novels I wholly recommend. Now, there are a few rules to this for anyone who’s reading. The first rule is that these entries have to have an LGBT person as the protagonist and not just as a side character. Second, it cannot be explicit and must be readable for anyone from fourteen to even nineteen years of age. And third, having no more than two of an authors’ works is acceptable by my standards because granted, I haven’t read every gay book for young adults; heck I’m even including ones I’ve reviewed on here already. And keep in mind that this is a recommendation list and not a list of the greatest LGBT young adult novels.

With that said, here’s the Top 10 List of LGBT YA Novels I Recommend.

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Review: “Openly Straight” (Openly Straight #1) by Bill Konigsberg

For my first post of LGBT Pride Month, I’m reading a gay romance novel that caught my eye while looking in a bookstore. The cover seemed nice, but the idea behind the book and the possibilities of it really caught my attention. I’ve heard of a few people say that they do not enjoy gay literature because according to them it’s the same old awkward romance you see in regular love stories. While it can be true in some cases, I have to disagree. Typically a gay romance doesn’t always have to have the romance as its focus, such as “Willful Machines” (which I reviewed a while ago). Much like zombie stories or horror films, a gay romance can be good with different variety and good characters, as well as an interesting story. And “Openly Straight” by Bill Konigsberg is one of these stories.

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Review: “Breaking Sky” by Cori McCarthy

If you ever grew up in the 90’s and early 2000’s like I have, you might also look at fighter-jet/plane action movies like “Top Gun”, “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow” or even a bad Michael Bay film like “Pearl Harbor” the same way I do. They are fun and seem like okay films, but there comes certain times where you want to see yourself in a jet or fighter plane like an action hero. With “Top Gun” I remember the video game more than the movie, since it focused more on interactions with characters rather than dogfights.

In Cori McCarthy’s “Breaking Sky”, it feels more like a futuristic “Top Gun” if the setting and characters were more interesting. Is it a good young adult book though, as well as a good thrill for literary thrill-seekers?

In the far future, it is the Second Cold War (technically aren’t we in one right now?) and  Continue reading