Review: “My Brother’s Husband” (Volume 1) by Gengoroh Tagame

You’re a single Japanese father named Yaichi, who spends most of time at home raising his rambunctious but innocent daughter Kana. One day, a large foreigner from Canada named Mike Flanagan arrived at their doorstep and reveals himself to be Kana’s uncle. Not only that, but the husband of Yaichi’s estranged (and sadly deceased) twin brother Ryouji. Illustrated and written by Genoroh Tagame, this is the plot of “My Brother’s Husband”.

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Review: “Sorceress Resurrected” (Clio Boru series #3) by Evan Michael Martin

It’d be hard to lie and say 2016 hasn’t been a depressing year. War in the Middle East has intensified, a nasty presidential election has left the nation feeling empty inside, many terrorists attacks have shaken the world, and countless cultural icons have passed away (including Carrie Fisher and George Michael earlier this week). However, there’s a saying that fiction is a way to showcase how worse or better a world like ours can be. That is why this New Year’s Eve, I am going to review a new book that part of something somewhat special to me. That is, the third installment of Evan Michael Martin’s “Clio Boru” series!

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Minnesota Furry Migration 2016 update

Update: September 9th, 2016. 

Yesterday, I spent my time having so much fun at Furry Migration 2016, whose theme was ‘Quest for Shiny’ amid a treasure hunt I sadly didn’t take part in. Although it wasn’t as massive as something like Anthrocon in Pittsburgh, the convention is still a ton of fun. After the Opening Ceremonies and a greeting to the Guests of Honor, the convention began with heavy cheer and barking! Oh, and some fursuits :3

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Review: The “Off the Beaten Path” trilogy by Rukis Croax

**All respective images used in this review rightfully belong to Rukis Croax

This week as I’m enjoying Furry Migration 2016 (and having so much fun! :D), I thought I’d take the time and do a review on this book trilogy I’ve been wanting to review for a while. This is a book trilogy made by the artistic illustrator/prodigal writer in the furry fandom, Rukis Croax.

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Review: “An Ember in the Ashes” (An Ember in the Ashes #1) by the wonderful Sabaa Tahir

“An Ember in the Ashes” by Sabaa Tahir. This is a novel that I’ve been waiting an eternity to get to ever since I spotted it on the shelves and read the back cover. If you know me really well, I used to see fantasy as this cookie-cutter genre. I despised reading such novels because I always assumed that all it involved were kings, dwarves, elves, and dragons and such. And…yeah you can argue I wasn’t that far off.

But then last year I reviewed a certain novel that’s become a favorite of mine called “The Young Elites” by Marie Lu. And in case you haven’t read the review (not that you can’t via the link but still), you know how much I love it! 😀

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Review: “Christian Nation” by Frederic C. Rich

This is a novel I’ve been wanting to talk about for a long time. Granted, I’m not that much of an intellectually political type (hell, on only an English major in college right now), but I’m also a sucker for dystopian novels, especially if it’s relevant to the times we’re in. And with a controversial US Presidential election nearing, I thought it would be right to talk about Frederic C. Rich’s political thriller novel, “Christian Nation”.

Before anyone starts to have a heart attack, I should mention that I have absolutely nothing against religion, yet I do not condone violence or hate in the name of any God. Any religion that wholly believes in taking other people’s rights away is no religion, but why don’t I get started on the review before I begin a flame war on religion, right?

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Review: “Pax” by Sara Pennypacker

What makes the bond of an owner and a pet so special? What makes that bond so inseparable in someone’s youth and adulthood? These are questions I’ve asked ever since my first dog died over a decade ago, and I’ve learned the answer to as I grew up.

“Pax” is a novel I initially noticed while visiting a local bookstore, and was drawn to how simple yet detailed Jon Klassen’s illustration of the cover showed. Add Sara Pennypacker’s heartwarming and poignantly timeless writing style similar to “Coraline”, and you get s novel that left me yearning for a good ending.

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