Review: “I Hunt Killers” (Jasper Dent #1) by Barry Lyga

Serial killers: they’re pinnacles of murder mysteries and most of the time becoming icons in both literature and film such as Hannibal Lecter from The Silence of the Lambs. When it comes to young adult fiction however, serial killer characters themselves can usually be hit or miss. it’s not that the book may be bad, but the big reveal can either be disappointing or the idea not clever enough for its own good.  Continue reading

Review: “Genius: The Game” by Leopoldo Gout

Albert Einstein once said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” In some ways, he is correct. It is the imagination of a person that depends on their success in life, and the change they bring to the world. Whether they be an artist, a poet, a tinker, or even your average handsome book critic on the Internet, creativity gives us ambition. Ambition guides us, and ideas drive us to make things.

Continue reading

Review: “Christian Nation” by Frederic C. Rich

This is a novel I’ve been wanting to talk about for a long time. Granted, I’m not that much of an intellectually political type (hell, on only an English major in college right now), but I’m also a sucker for dystopian novels, especially if it’s relevant to the times we’re in. And with a controversial US Presidential election nearing, I thought it would be right to talk about Frederic C. Rich’s political thriller novel, “Christian Nation”.

Before anyone starts to have a heart attack, I should mention that I have absolutely nothing against religion, yet I do not condone violence or hate in the name of any God. Any religion that wholly believes in taking other people’s rights away is no religion, but why don’t I get started on the review before I begin a flame war on religion, right?

Continue reading

Review: “Pax” by Sara Pennypacker

What makes the bond of an owner and a pet so special? What makes that bond so inseparable in someone’s youth and adulthood? These are questions I’ve asked ever since my first dog died over a decade ago, and I’ve learned the answer to as I grew up.

“Pax” is a novel I initially noticed while visiting a local bookstore, and was drawn to how simple yet detailed Jon Klassen’s illustration of the cover showed. Add Sara Pennypacker’s heartwarming and poignantly timeless writing style similar to “Coraline”, and you get s novel that left me yearning for a good ending.

Continue reading